Avraham Goldberg Jewish Women from Shtetl / Israeli Judaica Polish Modern Art

Avraham-Goldberg-Jewish-Women-from-Shtetl-Israeli-Judaica-Polish-Modern-Art-01-xlhz
Avraham Goldberg Jewish Women from Shtetl / Israeli Judaica Polish Modern Art

Avraham Goldberg Jewish Women from Shtetl / Israeli Judaica Polish Modern Art
1906, Poland – 1980, Tel Aviv, Israel. Two Jewish Women from the “Shtetl”. Artist Name : Avraham Goldberg. Title : Two Jewish women from the “Shtetl”. Signature Description : Hand-signed lower left. Technique : Ink on paper. Size: 26 x 26 cm / 10.24″ x 10.24″ inch. With no evidence of tears, rips, wrinkles, repairs, wear, paint peelings or losses. Immigrated to the Land of Israel in 1922. Died in Tel Aviv, 1980. Studies Art Academy, New York. Lived in Paris and Tel Aviv. Had three mentors: Rembrandt, Daumier & the Jewish town. From them he learned the art of shadows and light, of character and of sadness. This is a Jewish painter at his entity, his topics and his spirituality. However, he was also a europian painter – through his methods, his selections of tone, and his blend of color and tones. Source: Painting and sculpting in. Haim Gamzu, Dvir publishing. Painting and sculpting in. Haim Gamzu, Dvir publishing. Avraham Goldberg (1906, Poland – 1980, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli painter. The most Jewish artist among the artists in Israel. Avraham Goldberg, son of Joseph and Rebecca-Sheindel, immigrated to the Land of Israel in 1922 at age 16. Sometime later he went to study painting in the United States and Paris, the two places he visited several times for extended periods, and presented his work there. Even then he became known as an Eretz Israel artist who paints “Jewish art”, referring to his special sensitiveness to what is literary known as “Jewish soul”. This setting is relevant to him because he was more likely to focus on one issue: memories from the parents’ home that was destroyed. Goldberg created working relationships and friendships with first class artists overseas and they opened doors for him. Nevertheless, he preferred to return to Israel and continued in creating his special world there. For Goldberg, Israel was the one and only place he called home. But wherever he lived Goldberg continued to paint his unique world in ink, pastels and oil. Haim Gamzu, the highly-renowned art historian and critic of Israeli art, wrote in his book “Painting and Sculpture in Israel”. Avraham Goldberg is the least “Eretz Israeli” among the Israeli painters, but their most “Jewish”… Almost all of his works evoke the echo of the non-existent Jewish town. They are soaked with a kind of internal Judaism, not rooted in the external landscapes of the town but with childhood memories clinging to the mothers expression, the singing in his father’s prayer, the home folklore since then. Goldberg paints the landscapes of the soul… Goldberg’s work is not simplistic. It reveals a little and conceals a lot… Over the old furniture and memories shadows are whispering and souls are floating, vague, somewhat frightened, melancholy with the sorrows of childhood that has passed, never to return… An artist who immortalized his memories. The attitude of the professional criticism to Goldberg always derives from the perspective that his paintings retained an ember of the world that was set on fire. He never used the term “Holocaust”. But through his daily work there was a feeling that he had a special mission, commemorating the’how’ – how it was before. In order to deal with the consequences of World War II he devoted himself to his memoirs populated with figures that seemed to have been deleted. Only occasionally he deviated from drawing his characters and drew other topics as allegedly a need for perspective to examine his own making from a different point of view. Goldberg created his miniature paintings when he found himself pursued his life in occupied Paris in World War II. Friends arranged for him a refuge inside a narrow cubicle with a tiny kitchen where he painted in pastels that his friends were able to get him. He overturned his cigarette cases and used the cardboard surfaces for painting organizing them on a small table like a chessboard. Goldberg also painted still lifes and landscapes of fields sprawling along the distance, hallucinatory like dreams, bordering on the abstract, as if he was looking for some rest. When Goldberg was asked about the distressed conditions and the limited ability to draw in a place where the elbow immediately hits the wall, he replied: “When an artist wants to draw, he will do so even under the table”. During his lifetime Avraham Goldberg was called “The Jewish Rembrandt”. It seemed he managed to discover the source of wondrous light of Rembrandt when he began to reveal what Dr. Gamzu named “Landscapes of his soul”. The British Jewish historian, Professor Cecil Roth, agreed with the opinion of Gamzu in his book “The Jewish Art” and added that he found in Goldbergs works even the spirit of the Dutch painter Jozef IsraĆ«ls. Goldbergs paintings indicate that he understood better than many others the secrets of the Jewish soul, not only in terms of the theme and story, but mostly because he managed to instill in the beholder a sense that he found a way to express the unknown dimension of the intangible soul; he managed to create this deep impression through the deceptive and intriguing contrast created among the different colors and the effect of light and shadow. He worked as the director of the theater that he built on his own. Out of the dark scenes he disclosed to the viewer the bright patch, while hiding the non-important and embedding it in the background, as an artist who knows well the secrets and value of the dimming of abstract art. The Studio – Home to artists. Goldbergs home in Ramat Aviv, where lived and worked, was also known as a place where renowned artists, collectors and art dealers often met. His works were in high demand and they can be found in museums and private collections in Israel and around the world and abroad. Even artists who shared totally different attitude and perception toward art, and were among the innovators and founders of the lyrical abstract “New Horizons” group, such as Avigdor Stematsky and Pinchas Abramovich, were among his close friends. There were fascinating conversations on the subject of creating and creation. Despite the difference in the artistic approach they had a fruitful dialogue. By accepting those who are different he is completely at peace with himself. His painting and his fellow artists painting are the essence of his life, Walkowitz said. Years later, in 1979, when Goldberg had terminal illness, he proved how right was Walkowitz when he refused to treatments that would take away the quality of life from the time left to finish his works. But as long as he possessed it, he could go back, touch it and possibly make some improvement. Until his last days, Goldberg “touched” his works and died at his home as he wanted. ISRAELI BUYERS MUST ADD 17% V. TO THE FINAL PRICE. We guarantee all items we sell are 100% authentic! View more great items. The item “Avraham Goldberg Jewish Women from Shtetl / Israeli Judaica Polish Modern Art” is in sale since Monday, November 28, 2016. This item is in the category “Art\Paintings”. The seller is “artshik” and is located in Tel Aviv. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Listed By: Dealer or Reseller
  • Signed?: Signed
  • Medium: Ink
  • Subject: Jewish heritage
  • Style: Modern
  • Region of Origin: Israel
  • Artist: Avraham Goldberg
  • Features: Signed
  • Originality: Original

Avraham Goldberg Jewish Women from Shtetl / Israeli Judaica Polish Modern Art