HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA

HOLOCAUST-Ghetto-WILNA-Jewish-SIGNED-ART-BOOK-Judaica-REVOLT-Israel-LITHUANIA-01-wn
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA

HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA
DESCRIPTION : Here for sale is a HOLOCAUST RELATED Jewish Judaica ART BOOK which is SIGNED by the ARTIST. The book by the name of REVOLT , Brings a collection of about 100 paintings , illustrations , drawings and graphics of the Vilna Ghetto and Jewish Partisans at war in 1943 , All made by the painting brush and drawing ink of ALEXANDER BOGEN , A renowned Jewish ARTIST who fought as a PARTISAN in the WILNO (Also Vilna, Vilno, Vilnius, Wilna in Lithuamnia, Lita, Lite) GHETTO REVOLT battles as well as other battles in the surrounding Lithuanian forests. This copy is magnificently SIGNED and INSCRIBED by the artist in an ART DIP PEN pen. It’s a THRILLING INSCRIPTION which is dedicated to the Israeli acclaimed auther and playwriter YEHOSHUA BAR YOSEF – TO AVIVA And YEHOSHUA BAR YOSEF – TO THE MAGNIFICENT WRITER From the ARTIST – PARTISAN Who came from JERUSALEM of LITHUANIA – LITE (WILNA) and IMMIGRATED to YERUSALEM Shel MA’LA – With APPRECIATION and TRUE FRIENDSHIP – A. Headings in hand calligraphy. 9 x 12 Around 250 unpaged throughout illustrated and painted unpaginated thick chromo pp. Very good condition of HC , DJ and inner book. (Pls look at scan for accurate AS IS images). Will be sent inside a protective rigid packaging. AUTHENTICITY : This an originaly HAND SIGNED and INSCRIBED copy , It holds a life long GUARANTEE for its AUTHENTICITY and ORIGINALITY. Will be sent inside a rigid protective packaging. The Vilna Ghetto, Vilnius Ghetto or Wilno Ghetto was a. World War II Jewish ghetto. Established and operated by. In the city of. In the territory of Nazi-administered. During roughly two years of its existence. Street executions, maltreatment and deportations to. Reduced the population of the ghetto from an estimated 40,000 to zero. Only several hundred people managed to survive, mostly by hiding in the forests surrounding the town, joining the. Or finding shelter among sympathetic locals. The Fareynikte Partizaner Organizatsye (United Partisan Organization) was formed on 21 January 1942 in the Vilna Ghetto. It took for its motto “We will not go like sheep to the slaughter, ” a phrase resurrected by Abba Kovner. This was one of the first resistance organizations established in the Nazi ghettos during World War II. Unlike in other ghettos, the resistance movement in the Vilna Ghetto was not run by ghetto officials. Jacob Gens, appointed head of the ghetto by the Nazis but originally chief of police, ostensibly cooperated with German officials in stopping armed struggle. The FPO represented the full spectrum of political persuasions and parties in Jewish life. It was headed by Yitzhak Wittenberg, Josef Glazman, and Abba Kovner. The goals of the FPO were to establish a means for the self-defence of the ghetto population, to sabotage German industrial and military activities and to join the partisan and Red Armys fight against the Nazis. Poet Hirsh Glick, a Vilna ghetto inmate who later died after having been deported to Estonia, penned the words for what became the famous Partisan Hymn, Zog nit keynmol, az du geyst dem letstn veg. In early 1943, the Germans caught a member of the Communist underground who revealed some contacts under torture and the Judenrat, in response to German threats, tried to turn Yitzhak Wittenberg, the head of the FPO, over to the Gestapo. The FPO was able to rescue him after he was seized in the apartment of Jacob Gens in a fight with Jewish ghetto police. Gens brought in heavies, the leaders of the work brigades, and effectively turned the majority of the population against the resistance members, claiming they were provoking the Nazis and asking rhetorically whether it was worth sacrificing tens of thousands for the sake of one man. Ghetto prisoners assembled and demanded the FPO give Wittenberg up. Ultimately Wittenberg himself made the decision to submit to the Nazi demands. He was taken to Gestapo headquarters in Vilnius and was reportedly found dead in his cell the next morning. Most people believed he had committed suicide. The rumour had it that Gens had slipped him a cyanide pill in their final meeting. The FPO was thoroughly demoralized by the chain of events and began to pursue a policy of sending young people out to the forest to join the Jewish partisans. This was controversial as well because the Nazis attempted to kill all family members of people who had joined the partisans. In the Vilna ghetto a “family” often included non-relations who registered as a member of a family in order to receive housing and a pitiful food ration. When the Nazis came to liquidate the ghetto in 1943, members of the FPO went on alert. Gens took control of the liquidation in order to keep the Nazi forces out of the ghetto and away from a partisan ambush, but helped fill the quota of Jews with those who could fight but were not necessarily part of the resistance. The FPO fled to the forest and fought with the partisans. On June 24, 1941, two days after their invasion of the Soviet Union, German troops occupied Vilna and began their assault on the local Jewish population. During the summer and fall, SS units and their Lithuanian collaborators killed more than 30,000 of Vilnas Jews, most of them at Ponar, a wooded area outside of the city. In response to these actions, activists from the various political factions within the Vilna ghetto began to organize resistance against the Nazis. At a meeting of Zionist youth groups on January 1, 1942, Abba Kovner read a stirring manifesto that urged Jews to rise up and fight. Hitler, he proclaimed, plans to destroy all the Jews of Europe, and the Jews of Lithuania have been chosen as the first in line. We will not be led like sheep to the slaughter! True, we are weak and defenseless, but the only reply to the murderer is revolt! Several weeks later, Zionist youth leaders and Communists within the ghetto formed the Fareynegte Partizaner Organizatsye (United Partisan Organization; FPO). With Yitzhak Wittenberg, a Communist, as chief commander and Abba Kovner as one of his lieutenants, the FPO set out to unite all the ghetto resistance groups, launch an uprising in the event of the ghettos liquidation, carry out sabotage, and encourage Jews outside of Vilna to take up arms and fight. To these ends, the Vilna ghetto fighters blew up a German military train, smuggled in arms, sabotaged German military equipment, set up an illegal printing press outside of the ghetto, and established ties to the Soviet resistance in the city and the forests. German police officials appeared before the ghettos Jewish leadership and threatened to destroy the ghetto and its 20,000 inhabitants unless the FPO leader was turned over to them. Fearful of massive German reprisals, the ghettos leaders and inhabitants called for Wittenbergs surrender. The ghetto fighters mobilized for action and even rescued their commander from the police, yet under such tremendous pressure, the FPO was compelled to give up Wittenberg. Abiding by his groups decision, he turned himself in, but committed suicide while in German hands. Following Wittenbergs death, Kovner took up the command of the FPO, and during the summer and fall of 1943, his fighters clashed with German forces within and without the ghetto. On September 1, the FPO mobilized its forces when German and Baltic police units entered the ghetto to round up Jews for deportation to Estonian labor camps. Fearing that the ghetto was to be liquidated, the Jewish underground called for an uprising. Though one of its units opened fire on German troops, the ghettos population did not heed the FPOs call to arms. The Jewish underground was thus forced to alter its strategy. He later became a noted poet and writer and was awarded the Israel Prize in Literature in 1970. Yehoshua Bar-Yosef Hebrew: -, b. 1992 was an Israeli writer. Bar-Yosef was born in Safed, Israel and was raised in a Haredi Jewish family. He later left Orthodox Judaism, and became a writer. He worked first as a newspaper editor, and then as a freelance journalist. [1] His work includes novels, novellas, short stories, plays and historical epics about Safed. [2] He received numerous literary awards, including the Bialik Prize in 1984. There is something Russian about Yosef Bar-Yosef’s face. At times, he looks like a character in a Chekhov play. But until a few years ago, the Jerusalem-born Bar-Yosef, an eighth-generation Israeli, had no connection to Russia aside from an endless veneration of Russian literature and the illustrious playwrights, especially Chekhov, Gogol and Gorky. “I feel extremely close to them, ” he says. More than Ibsen, Strindberg or Miller. His plays have proved great successes in Russia in the last decade and the Israel Prize for Theater, which he received on Independence Day, seems a choice influenced by his success abroad. The award comes as somewhat of a surprise. Generally, laureates are expected to have had greater influence on culture and society here. Bar-Yosef’s influence here, however, is barely perceptible: his plays are infrequently staged in Israel. It has been five years since his “Cooper” was staged at Beit Lessin. The playwright feels – is convinced, to be more precise – that we bear the blame for this. In comparison with Russia, he says, Israel has no cultural tradition, the audience has pedestrian tastes, and the artistic directors are captive to mistaken conceptions. “Look at this, ” he says, and with unconcealed pride shows the visitor an interview with the director and actor Sergei Yurski, whom he says is king of the Russian theater. ” Among other things, the interview, which appeared in the Russian weekly Ogonyok states: “Bar-Yosef is an extraordinary playwright in the contemporary, present-day, commercial world. Therefore, he can say in his play `This is the Great Sea,’ that a person shouldn’t waste time on foolish things like career, success and wealth. It would be impossible to devise anything more antimodern, for present-day Russia as well as present-day Israel. But if the theater in the world remains dramatic theater, it will need people like Bar-Yosef. Bar-Yosef does not suffice with quoting from the interview. To demonstrate Yurski’s greatness, he tells a story: He came to Israel six months ago. Artistic isolation The Russian chapter in his life began in the fall of 1991, when he was 58. At the time, Bar-Yosef asked a new immigrant, Svetlana Shenbrun, to translate his most successful play, “Difficult People” into Russian. Bar Yosef doesn’t speak the language. The stage designer Sasha Lisianski provided him with addresses of theaters in Moscow, and Bar-Yosef sent them copies of the translated play. Three weeks after the play arrived at Moscow’s famous Sovremennik Theater, Bar-Yosef was asked to sign a contract. “Galina Volchek, the theater’s artistic director, decided to direct it, ” Bar-Yosef recalls. She asked me if the play had been staged in Israel, and I answered that it had been staged here twice, with success. And then she asked: `And what about in the West? I told her that I wasn’t being staged, and she said: `Great! So we’ll beat them to it. She didn’t need the approval of others. She knew deep down that the play was good, because she was backed up by tradition and by culture. This is one of the things you find in Russia that you don’t find here. ” Bar-Yosef continues: “She opened up her desk drawer and showed me other Israeli plays that had been sent to her. `These aren’t interesting,’ she said to me. It is this sort of statement that causes the theater community in Israel to harbor reservations about Bar-Yosef. Few directors and actors are rushing to work with him, and to a large extent, he lives in artistic isolation. He barely carries on any dialogue with directors, producers and playwrights in Israel, and he sees very few Israeli plays. Bar-Yosef does not hold the few that he does see in especially high esteem. “There are few people with whom I feel that I share a common language, ” he says. One of the people now close to me is the poet Tamir Greenberg, who also recommended me for the Israel Prize. For me, a play is a rather sublime literary form that is very difficult to write. It is very hard to write a play with a good and surprising stage plot – with a beginning, a middle and an end, with rounded characters and a proper, healthy structure. Most of the theater doesn’t take this course, which may be legitimate. There are very few truly good plays, even in world literature. Most of them are no more than a chapter. The characters do not develop, and most plays have a good first act and a crummy second act. Sometimes I feel that I and the other playwrights in our age, not only in Israel, are not in the same profession. ” Lifelong dream Bar-Yosef, 70, well recalls the premiere of “Difficult People in Russia, on April 30, 1992. The dream he had since age 17 came true. In the dream, he is with the Russian writer Maxim Gorky, when suddenly there is shouting from a crowd massed in the city square, calling for him to come out. “I remember telling Gorky, ” Bar-Yosef says, `Go, they’re calling for you,’ but he placed his hand on my shoulder and said: `It’s for you,’ and led me outside to the Russian audience. That is what happened at the premiere of `Difficult People. The applause did not end, even after all the actors had left the stage, and then Galina Volchek walked up to me, placed her hand on my shoulder and said to me, `It’s for you,’ and led me toward the stage. ” The success of “Difficult People” paved the way for additional plays of Bar-Yosef in Russian – “The Orchard, ” “Gold” and “This is the Great Sea, which recently had its world premiere in Kiev. From Russia, his plays have gone on to Poland, the Czech Republic and even India. According to the Russian system, once a play has been staged in one theater, there is no longer any need to receive the author’s permission to stage it in other theaters. Thus, his plays began springing up in Peterburg, Kiev and Moscow, as well as in remote cities like Samara on the Volga River, and Khabarovsk at the edge of Siberia. Bar-Yosef is a member of the Union of Russian Writers, which collects the residuals for him. Though the residuals in Israel are signifcantly higher than in Russia, he says, If you asked me to choose between the two, I would choose to be a successful playwright in Russia, and not in Israel. Would you really choose to succeed there, and not here? There, the artistic test is much more difficult. I know that in Russia I was accepted by an artistic conscience that is also my own conscience. Practically speaking, I know that from there my plays will reach other places, and in Israel that would not necessarily happen. A relative, says Bar-Yosef, who visited Russia told him the generals there know his name. And then he says to me that succeeding in Germany or England is a tactical success, but succeeding in Russia is a strategic success. And that is how I feel. ” Asked how it felt when his most recent play, “This is the Great Sea, ” which takes place in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv and was written in Hebrew, had its world premiere in Russia and not in Israel, he replies: “It gave me a twinge in my heart. Two or three artistic directors and directors read the play here, and they saw it as a folklore play. In Kiev, they made it a great epic celebration. Snubbed by buyers Yosef Bar-Yosef is the son of the author Yehoshua Bar-Yosef. His resume includes stints as a building contractor and a journalist – he has written for Lamerhav, Davar, Haaretz and Yedioth Ahronoth. In 1962, Bar-Yosef wrote his first play, “Tura, ” about a new immigrant from Kurdistan whose family assigns him the duty of killing his favorite daughter after she becomes pregnant out of wedlock. After the play’s success in the Cameri, I was considered a successful playwright and was asked to write another play. I wrote `The Ewe,’ which had problems and did not succeed, and all at once I became an unsought-after playwright. It took three years from the time I wrote `Difficult People’ until they had the courage to stage it, in 1973, at the Haifa Theater. The theater managements don’t know how to read the plays themselves, and everything is measured according to the previous success. Bar-Yosef’s plays are light years from the journalistic genre that is still popular in Israel, and his writing is devoid of a political dimension. His plays are built around the little person, his weaknesses and loves, and in this respect he is a playwright in the mold of Chekhov. Nevertheless, his characters are decidedly Israeli and Jewish, and their background is also extremely local. Bar-Yosef has written 12 plays; half of which have succeeded in one degree or another: “Difficult People, ” “The Orchard, ” “Buche, ” “Gold, ” “Cooper” and This is the Great Sea. These are also his favorites. He does not hesitate to rewrite his plays even after they have been staged. This was the case with “Gold, ” which was rewritten after it premiered at Habima 15 years ago (“I felt there was potential in it that I hadn’t realized”), as well as “Cooper” (“I felt I had a good first act, but I didn’t have a second act, so I rewrote it and now it is one of my best plays”). Neither of the revised plays has been put on in Israel. Bar-Yosef blames the marketing system in Israel and way the theaters are managed: “In the past few years, the buyers and the subscription programs around the country have been those that run the theaters, ” he says. The theater directors are actually sub-contractors of the buyers, who are supposed to choose the plays, and that is why their situation is so severe. Out of their fear of having to succeed and the need to be liked by the buyers – and this is only natural, because they have to keep the theater afloat – they are bringing down the level. So they are less and less willing to take a risk with plays like mine, which are not always easy to digest. Are you aware that your winning of the Israel Prize came as a surprise to a lot of people in the theater world? I can imagine they were surprised. Nevertheless, it is not an entirely surprising surprise. It’s not as if my plays are not staged at all. Are you frustrated with the way your career has unfolded in Israel? I have had moments of frustration and anger, and I would be lying if I said I didn’t. I’m also mad when they don’t call me back. At some point I say go your own way, do what you want to do and I’ll do what I want to do. I think it’s a loss to culture, to the audience and to the actors in Israel. I have parts that no one else can give to actors, because there aren’t a lot of complex roles around, of flesh and blood and spirit, too. That’s what they tell me abroad, in Poland, the Czech Republic and Russia. The item “HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA” is in sale since Thursday, April 1, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Religion & Spirituality\Judaism\Books”. The seller is “judaica-bookstore” and is located in TEL AVIV. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country of Manufacture: Israel
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Lithuania
  • Religion: Judaism

HOLOCAUST Ghetto WILNA Jewish SIGNED ART BOOK Judaica REVOLT Israel LITHUANIA